How to Dye Easter Eggs with Kool-Aid

A few years ago, we used natural material to dye Easter Eggs. I thought about doing that this year, but when I looked through my panty and cupboard, I couldn’t come up with much to use and I really didn’t want to spend any money to dye eggs this year. Instead, I found a whole bunch of kool-aid packets I got for free last year after sales and coupons. We used it last year to dye beautiful Waldorf silks, but I had a bunch left over. Since I won’t let my kids drink the nasty stuff (mean mom…), I decided to use it up on Easter Eggs!

To make your own Easter Egg Kool-Aid dye – just mix a packet of Kool-Aid with one warm cup water. I also added a splash of vinegar, but I don’t think that’s necessary.  You don’t need to leave the eggs in the dye very long. If you leave them in the dye for a while, the water starts to bubble and they get speckled. It’s almost like the vinegar is eating the color. I’m sure it’s some sort of chemical reaction with the vinegar…but I’m not a scientist and don’t know. If you happen to know, leave a comment! Our very speckled ones were left in the dye for 10 minutes.

We colored some of them with a white crayon first to get designs.

We used mason jars and slowly lowered the eggs with spoons.


Flat Stanley came to visit from St. Louis and wanted to help dye eggs before he goes home.


Of course, anytime the camera comes out, my kids get silly…


Our eggs! The red ones on yarn are eggs we did last year! We’re not finished yet. The kids would like to blow a few eggs and dye them for the Easter tree we’re working on. Pictures when it’s finished!

Do you dye eggs? What technique do you use?

Linking up: Project Party Weekend; Refresh Your Nest; Country Mama Cooks; Tater Tots & Jello; Cure for the Common Monday; Mix it up Monday; Works for Me Wednesday; Mom on Timeout; Creative Juice; Strut Your Stuff; Show off your Stuff; It’s a Keeper Thursday; Creative Timeout;

Comments

  1. says

    So fun to see Flat Stanley! Our 1st and 2nd graders have him as a project each year. This summer my soon to be 1st grader will be taking him to the historic sites in our area.

    I need to figure out how to blow out the insides of the eggs since my family, except, me doesn’t like to eat eggs. Any tips? Is it possible to keep the yolk whole so I can separate the white and yolk?

  2. says

    This post is being featured tonight @CountryMommaCooks Linky Party, stop by and pick up a button if you don’t already have one:)

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